Upstate woman receives death threats after social media account hacked

An upstate woman is receiving death threats after her Facebook account was hacked. She says the harassment has been going on for weeks and wants others to be aware of the dangers around them. Judy Hollaway says it started when she saw a Facebook post from a friend about bitcoin. She says she was skeptical about it, so she privately messaged her friend to ask about it. you trust me?’ She’s supposed to be a friend of mine.” At first, Hollaway says she sent her friend her photo ID without showing any of her information. “She said, ‘No, like that,’ and she sent me back her photo ID,” Hollaway said. “She had her name, her address, her picture.” So cautiously shared some of her information with her friend. Within minutes, she says she had been locked out of her Facebook account and received messages from unknown numbers asking for money.Hollaway says she never originally sent money because she was trying to be careful. expected the messages to subside, but then she says the hackers started sending threatening messages.”Then last Sunday the death threat came,” Hollaway said. OK, well, I am at Pickens.” Eventually, Hollaway says she began to receive extremely disturbing photos and videos, and detailed death threats. “t,” she said. She says she reported everything to the Pickens Police Department. “It started with who she thought was a friend,” Chef Randal Beach said. “It was an element of trust. Not a stupid element. Beach explains that there is a federal order regarding information and evidence on social media when it comes to criminal cases. However, he says there is no order for a situation like this. Beach says they can’t just go to Facebook and take messages, information or evidence without proper warrants and grounds. With a business that is not locally based, he says they are not required to comply with a local ordinance. “They are not required by law to comply with a subpoena from the City of Pickens City Court,” Beach said. He says he has tried to contact Facebook through a law enforcement portal to help Hollaway regain access to his account, but has yet to be successful. Hollaway hopes this will serve as a lesson to others. She says she just wants her account back so she can access some sentimental things that are still there. Beach urges everyone to use security procedures like two-factor authentication, and to never write down credentials or logins.

An upstate woman is receiving death threats after her Facebook account was hacked.

She says the harassment has been going on for weeks and wants others to be aware of the dangers around them.

Judy Hollaway says it started when she saw a Facebook post from a friend about bitcoin. She says she was skeptical about it, so she privately messaged her friend to ask about it.

“She said, ‘Let me have your driver’s license,’ and I said hmm,” Hollaway said. “She said ‘Judy, do you trust me? She’s supposed to be a friend of mine.

At first, Hollaway says she sent her friend her photo ID without showing any of her information.

“She said, ‘No, like that,’ and she sent me back her photo ID,” Hollaway said. “Had his name, address, picture.”

Hollaway says her friend, who she later believed was also hacked, returned her own driver’s license. So cautiously shared some of her information with her friend.

Within minutes, she says she was blocked on her Facebook account and received messages from unknown numbers asking for money.

Hollaway says she never sent the money originally because she was trying to be careful.

She expected the messages to go down, but then she says the hackers started sending threatening messages.

“Then last Sunday the death threat came,” Hollaway said. “The first was ‘You’ll be kidnapped by Monday. OK, well, I’m at Pickens.

Eventually, Hollaway says she began receiving extremely disturbing photos and videos and detailed death threats.

“I thought how stupid I was to think I was sending my information to my friend and it wasn’t,” she said.

She says she reported everything to the Pickens Police Department.

“It started with who she thought she was a friend with,” chef Randal Beach said. “It was an element of confidence. Not a dumb component.

Beach explains that there is a federal level order regarding information and evidence on social media when it comes to criminal cases. However, he says there is no order for a situation like this.

Beach says they can’t just go to Facebook and take messages, information or evidence without proper warrants and grounds. With a business that is not locally based, he says they are not required to comply with a local ordinance.

“They are not required by law to comply with a subpoena from the City of Pickens City Court,” Beach said.

He says he has tried to contact Facebook through a law enforcement portal to help Hollaway regain access to his account, but has yet to be successful.

Hollaway hopes this will serve as a lesson to others. She says she just wants her account back so she can access some sentimental things that are still there.

Beach urges everyone to use security procedures like two-factor authentication and never write down credentials or logins.

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